Stars Over Eden logo

Emission Spectra of Glow in the Dark Powders

This page shows the emission spectra of the seven glow in the dark powders featured in these videos. All emission spectra were measured while stimulating the samples with a 405 nanometer (nm) laser. For this reason, each spectrum below has a large peak centered at 405 nm that is not part of the emission spectra of the powder itself.

Star burst image.

Aqua glow powder:

Emission spectrum of aqua glow in the dark powder

The aqua glow powder appears to emit two photons in the visible spectrum. One of about 482 nm wavelength and one of about 502 nm wavelength.

Star burst image.

Blue glow powder:

Emission spectrum of blue glow in the dark powder

The blue glow powder emits a photon of around 470 nm wavelength, but the small "shoulder" on the right side of the 470 nm peak may indicate a second photon of roughly 510 nm wavelength.

Star burst image.

Green glow powder:

Emission spectrum of green glow in the dark powder

The green glow powder emits two photons; one of about 515 nm wavelength and one (the shoulder on the right side of the 515 nm peak) of about 548 nm wavelength.

Star burst image.

Red (Strontium Aluminate) glow powder:

Emission spectrum of red strontium aluminate glow in the dark powder

The red strontium aluminate glow powder emits four photons in the visible spectrum. They are about 598 nm, 618 nm, 624 nm, and 706 nm wavelengths.

Star burst image.

Red (Zinc Sulfide) glow powder:

Emission spectrum of red zinc sulfide in the dark powder

The red zinc sulfide glow powder has a single broad emission peak centered at around 656 nm. This peak, however, seems too broad to be caused by a photon of just one wavelength. It is likely instead that the powder emits a closely spaced cluster of photons centered at 656 nm. There appears to be small shoulder on the right side of the 656 nm peak, which may represent a photon of roughly 670 nm wavelength.

Star burst image.

Violet glow powder:

Emission spectrum of violet glow in the dark powder

The violet glow powder appears to emit only one photon, of about 464 nm wavelength. This is seen as the shoulder on the side of the 405 nm peak. Recall, the 405 nm peak is an artifact from the laser used to stimulate the glow powder.

Star burst image.

White glow powder:

Emission spectrum of white glow in the dark powder

The white glow powder is described by its manufacturer as a combination of the blue and red glow powders. The two peaks of the blue glow powder (at roughly 470 nm and 510 nm) and three of the four peaks of the red glow powder (at roughly 598 nm, 618 nm, 624 nm) can seen in the spectrum.

Star burst image.

(Return to Home Page)