Stars Over Eden logo with “(1) Introduction to Star Murals” text.

Frequency asked questions about this tutorial's topic

(Q) In some scenes in the video the stars on the ceiling appear to be twinkling. Is that real, and if so, how do you make it happen?

 

(A) It isn’t real. It is just an artifact of the video camera.

Star burst image.

(Q) I am wondering if there has ever been a time when you mixed two glow paints together. I am thinking of getting the blue and violet and mixing them together for my Milky Way, so as to have a more brilliant colour, and I really like violet, but at the same time, I am worried about detracting from the stars. Also, the paint is very expensive, so I don't want to get some just to experiment with and ultimately waste if I don't like the result. What is your opinion?

Thanks.

Ivy C.

 

(A) Hello, Ivy. Thank you for writing. The only two glow powders I have mixed were red and blue, and it didn't work well: The red has a short glow time (about 10 minutes) and mixing it with the blue (which glows for several hours) somehow seemed to reduce the blue's glow time to that of the red. In other words, the mixture glowed for only about 10 minutes and not very brightly.

Like yourself, I really like the violet. It is the most beautiful of the glow colors, in my opinion. Unfortunately, it has a fairly short glow time (about an hour, maximum). I suspect that if you mix the blue and the violet for your milky way, you will run into the same problem I did when I mixed the red and the blue. A short glow time (about an hour, I suspect) and reduced brightness.

So even though the violet is a great color, I think the milky way is best painted with a longer glow color, such as blue or aqua. But if you do try
the mixture on your milky way, please let me know the result.

 

Take care,

Stars

Star burst image.

(Q) Some glow powder manufacturers claim their white glow powder glows for hours. Why do you say it glows for only a short time?

 

(A) The white glow powder is a mixture of blue and red glow powders. The blue portion of the white powder does glow for many hours, but the red portion does not, and therefore the white glow changes to blue in just a few minutes.

Star burst image.

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